Tanzania Part 5: Jozani forest – Monkeys & Cardamom

Jozani forest

On our way back from Paje, we stopped by the Jozani forest where we took a tour to see the endangered Colobus monkeys, the mangrove, and a spice tour. A great pit-stop on the way.

We got to see the friendly Colobus monkeys – a species that only can be found on Zanzibar – up-close, hear the stories of how important cloves historically have been for the economy of Zanzibar, but also smell, touch and taste different spices, and maybe most importantly – buy quite a bit of really delicious Zanzibar cardamom.

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest

Jozani forest + spice tour

Tanzania Part 4: A break on Zanzibar’s Paje beach

Paje, Zanzibar

After a couple of days of rough travelling, and my own months of a pretty intense Red Cross contract (immediately after my Belize contract) – I was more than excited for some relaxing beach time on Zanzibar. Our safari driver dropped us off by the ferry terminal in Dar es Salaam, and after the 2h boat ride we hopped straight into a cab by the ferry terminal. Be careful with the prices as they are trying hard to rip people off, there are even laminated “Government price lists” which are almost 4x the actual price. I had called our Zanzibar hotel the day before and asked what a cab should cost so we had a bargaining goal which we were able to hit.

The driver took us to Paje beach on the other side of the Island, where we checked in at Dhow Inn and had a good night’s sleep after having spent another entire day travelling. What we did next was my favourite of activities – absolutely nothing! We chilled on the beach, read books, walked around, painted our nails, had nice dinners, went to nearby Pingwe to the hyped restaurant The Rock which indeed was very cool – and spent the entire afternoon just chilling at Upendo, a chilled bar where we had fruit cocktails while a dj was spinning Fela Kuti tracks. We stayed until the mosquitoes came out.

Paje was a quiet and calm town with crispy white beaches, low tide and palm trees, friendly Masaai men selling handicrafts without being too pushy, and kite surfers with long hair spending their entire days on their boards. It was low season so there weren’t a lot of people around and it would probably have gotten rather boring to spend another day there – but to really get a proper break and some quiet time, Paje was absolutely perfect.

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Paje, Zanzibar

Paje, ZanzibarPaje, Zanzibar

Paje, ZanzibarPaje, Zanzibar

Paje, ZanzibarPaje, Zanzibar

Paje, Zanzibar Paje, Zanzibar

Paje, ZanzibarPaje, Zanzibar

Paje, ZanzibarPaje, Zanzibar

Paje, ZanzibarPaje, Zanzibar

Paje, ZanzibarPaje, Zanzibar

Paje, ZanzibarPaje, Zanzibar

Paje, Zanzibar

Paje, ZanzibarPaje, Zanzibar Paje, ZanzibarPaje, ZanzibarPaje, ZanzibarPaje, Zanzibar

Tanzania Part 3: We survived our safari in Selous so I could show you these photos

Selous National Park - Tanzania

Next morning, we took off after an early breakfast and headed straight to the gates of the Selous Game Reserve again, where we spent the day first walking and then driving around, learning about the plants, insects and animals that the wilderness of Tanzania wanted to show us.

Finding the lions was not an easy task, but suddenly we saw them – and just as we did, our jeep got stuck in the mud. The driver wanted to get out of the car to manually shift the wheels to 4×4, so he revved the engine and opened the door to get out, but the lioness was just looking straight at him, from the other side of the hood, just a couple of feet away from where he needed to reach to hit the switch. He decided to close the door and get back into the car.

We closed the windows but our roof was pretty much open. I took some photos of the lioness that seemed rather uninterested, but judging from how our guide started sweating and looking rather uneasy, we sat down quietly and looked at her and her cubs in awe through the window. As the tension in the air slowly rose and I started wondering how long we would be sitting there and calculating how long the water would last us for – another jeep with a Japanese film crew pulled over, and their guide helped us out of the mud.

A similar thing happened with the elephants, as we had been looking around for them the entire day. I love elephants so I was excited to show my mom their grandeur, but the elephants in Selous were very different from the ones I had seen in Swaziland and Botswana before – Selous is apparently also a quite busy hunting ground, and elephants are intelligent animals – let’s just say they were not excited about seeing our jeep, and did everything to scare us off. And that elephants are big, scary and very dangerous.

All in all, it was a very enriching and exciting experience, but we basically survived both death-by-lion and death-by-elephant just so I can show you these photos, so do enjoy.

And yes – there were zebras too, and giraffes of course – ever so gracious.

Selous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - Tanzania

Tanzania Part 2: Rufiji river cruise

Selous National Park - Tanzania

After our second night in Dar es Salaam, we got packed and ready for adventure – and were picked up at 7.30 in the morning by the tour company we had booked a tour with – Waterbuck Safaris. We drove for almost six hours to the Selous Game Reserve, where we were going to spend two nights at the Zarafa Tented camp, and were greeted by the very nice manager, Henrick, with popcorn and orange juice. After checking in and dropping bags, we headed straight to the Rufiji river, where the captain took us for a cruise to see the sunset, some birds, crocodiles and hippos.

A very nice evening after a quite tiresome drive. And a gorgeous sunset.

Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania

Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania
Selous National Park - TanzaniaSelous National Park - Tanzania

Tanzania Part 1: Our first two days in Dar es Salaam

Going to Tanzania

As per tradition, my mom and I went for a trip in August. This time we went to Tanzania for two weeks which were to consist of walking, eating and exploring. We landed in Dar es Salaam, where we stayed in the middle of downtown and spent the first two days just walking around town and exploring. As always, we headed for the markets (The Kivukoni fish market and the Kariakoo market), spoke with people and tried a lot of street food. And on the second day we went to the more touristy Slipway Shopping Center in Masaki district where we sat in a bar by the sea and had a well deserved break, and I had a Savanna Dry cider! Hadn’t had those since Mozambique and was very happy to finally officially introduce my mother to the refreshing taste and a glimpse of what my life in Mozambique had been.

We were so excited to be in Tanzania and start another adventure, and this one had all the good things in store.

Dar es Salaam

Dar es SalaamDar es Salaam

Dar es Salaam

Dar es SalaamDar es SalaamDar es SalaamDar es SalaamDar es SalaamDar es SalaamDar es SalaamDar es SalaamDar es SalaamDar es SalaamDar es SalaamDar es SalaamVeronicaDar es SalaamDar es SalaamDar es SalaamDar es SalaamDar es SalaamDar es SalaamDar es SalaamDar es Salaam

My 7 months with the Red Cross family: Greece

Lesvos, Greece
I travelled to many places with the IFRC as Regional Community Engagement Delegate (so, coordinating the way the red cross interacts with, informs, and collects feedback from refugees – across Europe) – but I definitely spent the most of my time visiting refugee camps in Greece. I started off my contract by immediately being deployed to the island Lesvos – where most people were arriving at the time. I also went several times to the north of Greece, to Idomeni and different locations around Thessaloniki and Athens. The job was difficult and very demanding, but also very rewarding – I had the opportunity to meet with amazing refugee volunteers, and the Greek people was extraordinarily hospitable and helpful in this very difficult situation.

And then, as a great bonus, there were all the colleagues and staff from partner organisations that I got to work closely with – engaged, passionate and hard-working people. Work-wise, it was both the most demanding and inspiring assignment I’ve had so far, with true solidarity at its core.

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Lesvos, Greece
Lesvos, Greece
Lesvos, Greece
Lesvos, Greece
Lesvos, Greece
Lesvos, Greece
Lesvos, Greece
Idomeni, Greece
Idomeni, Greece
Idomeni, Greece
Idomeni, Greece
Idomeni, Greece
Idomeni, Greece
Idomeni, Greece
Idomeni, Greece
Idomeni, Greece
Idomeni, Greece
Idomeni, Greece
Nea Kavala Refugee Camp
Nea Kavala Refugee Camp
Idomeni, Greece
Idomeni, Greece
Nea Kavala Refugee camp
Nea Kavala Refugee camp
Nea Kavala Refugee camp
Nea Kavala Refugee camp
Nea Kavala Refugee camp
Nea Kavala Refugee camp
Cherso refugee camp
Cherso refugee camp
Cherso refugee camp
Cherso refugee camp
Cherso refugee camp
Cherso refugee camp
Cherso refugee camp
Cherso refugee camp
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MINOX 35 ML

My 7 months with the Red Cross family: Other missions

Macedonia

I didn’t get photos of all the workshops, missions and travels I did with the IFRC, but here are some of them. I had the opportunity to visit some of the Red Crescent community centres in Turkey’s Ankara, Konya and Istanbul, I got to visit different camps in Macedonia, I did presentations in Sofia, Budapest, and Vienna, I participated in the Regional Disaster Response Team training in Bulgaria, and I took part in a global workshop to define the first Red Cross Red Crescent movement guide for community engagement and accountability. An intense learning period, definitely.

Macedonia
Macedonia
Ankara, Turkey
Ankara, TurkeyKonya, Turkey
Konya, TurkeyKonya, Turkey
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